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Polishing

Flipped the orientation on this piece (for the better) and have been polishing it up for the exhibit. Sorry for the glare.

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Exhibition List

Alicia Tormey: Organica. Chase Young Gallery, Boston, MA. April 1-25, 2015.
Ambreen Butt: I Am All What Is Left Of Me. Carroll and Sons, Boston, MA. April 3-May 16, 2015.
Andrew Masullo: Recent Paintings. Stephen Zeveitas Gallery, Boston, MA. February 5- March 14, 2015.
Anna Collette: Gathering Ground. Gallery Kayafas, Boston, MA. January 16-February 21, 2015.
Ann Wessmann: Tulip Project. Kingston Gallery, Boston MA. April 1-26, 2015.
Bill Yates: Sweetheart Roller Skating Rink, 1972-73. Gallery Kayafas, Boston, MA. February 27-April 4, 2015.
Bren Bataclan, Alison Horvitz, Karen Klein, Ronni Komarow and Carol Wontkowski: Visual Context. Galatea Fine Art, Boston, MA. February 4-28, 2015.
Catherine Kernan: Breathing Space. Soprafina Gallery, Boston, MA. April 3-30, 2015.
Clara Wainwright: Learning from Animals. Gallery Kayafas, Boston, MA. February 27-April 4, 2015.
Connecticut College Art Department: Transmissions: Teaching and Learning in the Studio. Lyman Allyn Art Museum, New London, Connecticut. February 10- June 7, 2015.
Conny Golz-Schmitt: Uncovered. Kingston Gallery, Boston, MA. April 1-26, 2015.
Dominick Takis: Symbiosis: Sicilian, Irish and Other Travel Interpretations with Lichen. Galatea Fine Art, Boston, MA. June 3-28, 2015.
Francis Domec: Linear Expressions. Galatea Fine Art, Boston, MA. June 3-28, 2015.
Gallery Artists. Bromfield Gallery, Boston, MA. Febrauary 4-March 1, 2015.
George McNeil: About Place. ACME Gallery, Boston, MA. January 9-February 21, 2015.
Greg Heins: Flowers of Sorrow. Gallery Kayafas, Boston, MA. January 16-February 21, 2015.
Gurari Collections, Boston, MA. January 2015.
Hope M. Ricciardi: A Century of Waiting. Galatea Fine Art, Boston, MA. April 1-26, 2015.
Jules Aarons: Original exhibition prints from Aarons’ 1951 Institute of Contemporary Art solo exhibit. Gallery Kayafas, Boston, MA. February 27-April 4, 2015.
Kathleen Gerdon Archer: As Above, So Below. Kingston Gallery, Boston, MA. February 4- March 1, 2015.
Leslie Park: Place Settings. Soprafina Gallery, Boston, MA. January 6-February 28, 2015.
Lisa Reindorf: sHIFT. Galatea Fine Art, Boston, MA. June 3-28, 2015.
Lost Gardens of New England. Lyman Allyn Art Museum, New London, Connecticut. March 1- July 31, 2015.
Michael Sheinkman: Recent Paintings. Steven Zevitas Gallery, Boston, MA. March 19-April 25, 2015.
Michael Shores: Visions of the Otherworld. Galatea Fine Art, Boston, MA. April 1-26, 2015.
Michele Fandal Bonner: Time and Materials. Kingston Gallery, Boston, MA. April 1-26, 2015.
Nathan Hale Arts Magnet School. Lyman Allyn Art Museum, New London, Connecticut. May 9-June 7, 2015.
Pat De Groot and Friends. Acme Gallery, Boston, Ma. May 14- June 20, 2015.
Pat Lipsky: Twenty Years, Geometric Abstraction: 1995-2015. ACME Fine Art, Boston, MA. March 6-April 25, 2015.
Peter Tollens: Oil and Water. Miller Yezerski Gallery, Boston, MA. April 2015.
Philip Gerstein: Experiment. Galatea Fine Art, Boston, MA. April 1-26, 2015.
Robert Feintuch: Recent Work. Miller Yezerski Gallery, Boston, MA. February 13- March 17, 2015.
Robert Oppenheim: Je Suis. Miller Yezerski Gallery, Boston, MA. February 6- March 17, 2015.
Sage Sohier: At Home with Themselves; Same-Sex Couples in 1980’s America. Carroll and Sons, Boston, MA. February 18-March 28, 2015.
Tara Sellios: Luxuria. Gallery Kayafas, Boston, MA. May 22-June 27, 2015.
The Guston Effect. Stephen Zeveitas Gallery, Boston, MA. May 15- August 15, 2015.
Terry Gips: Quantum Entanglement. Galatea Fine Art, Boston, MA. February 4-28, 2015.
Vivian Pratt: Inner Terrains. Bromfield Gallery, Boston, MA. April 1-26, 2015.
Yoav Horesh: Where We Stand. Gallery Kayafas, Boston, MA. January 16-February 21, 2015.
Youngsheen A. Jhe: Portraits of Boston. Galatea Fine Art, Boston, MA. February 4-28, 2015.

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Artist Statement
My work explores and confronts the ways in which my anxiety manifests in my studio practice. My generalized anxiety disorder falls on the high end of the spectrum, and links can be made between my art and the fear/panic that drives it.
The bulk of my day-to-day anxieties stem from interpersonal interactions, and the social anxiety that is elicited as a result. Appropriately, my work tends to fall into the realm of the human figure. Facets of human interaction such as psychological control, romantic relationships, and identity are topics that I’ve dealt with during this semester. Formal aspects such as size, palette, and content are utilized to further the ideas represented on canvas.

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Bibliography

• Carruthers et al: The Manchester Color Wheel: development of a novel way of identifying color choice and its validation in healthy, anxious and depressed individuals. BMC Medical Research Methodology 2010 10:12.
• Cozzolino, Robert. Narcissus in the Studio: Artist Portraits and Self-Portraits. Philadelphia: Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, 2010. Print.
• Goldberg, RoseLee. “Performance Anxiety: Political Currents at the Whitney Biennial.” Modern Painters May 2008: 42-45. Google Scholar. Web. 8 June 2015.
• Gregory, Amanda. “False Heretics: Adolescent Attachment and Religious Rebellion.” Psychology Tomorrow Magazine. N.p., n.d. Web. 7 Apr. 2015.
• Lubow, Arthur. “Homepage | Smithsonian.” Homepage | Smithsonian. N.p., Mar. 2006. Web. 19 Apr. 2015
• “Edvard Munch”. Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online.
Encyclopædia Britannica Inc., 2015. Web. 19 Apr. 2015
<http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/397389/Edvard-Munch/5076/Paintings-of-love-and-death&gt;.
• “Myopia Road: Reflections on Painting and Therapy.” Psychology Tomorrow Magazine. N.p., n.d. Web. 7 Apr. 2015.
• Oates, Joyce Carol. “The Aesthetics of Fear.” JSTOR [JSTOR]. N.p., n.d. Web. 11 June 2015.
• Peck, Ben. “The History and Tyranny of the DSM.” http://www.psychologytomorrowmagazine.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 7 Apr. 2015
• Rowa, Karen and Antony, Martin M. “Chapter 3: Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Chapter 4: Social Anxiety Disorder.” Psychopathology: History, Diagnosis, and Empirical Foundations. By W. Edward Craighead, David J. Miklowitz, and Linda W. Craighead. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2008. N. pag. Google Scholar. Web. 13 June 2015.
• Shawn, Tracy. “The Art of Anxiety.” Psychology Tomorrow Magazine. N.p., n.d. Web. 7 Apr. 2015.
• Vidler, Anthony. Warped Space: Art, Architecture, and Anxiety in Modern Culture. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Press, 2000. Digital Database. June 13 June 2015.
• Wallach, Alan. “Response: On Subliminal Iconography.” EBSCO. N.p., n.d. Web. 9 Apr. 2015.

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April & May

This is my most recent 36×48” painting. It’s untitled, but hopefully that will change soon. This piece is highly personal, as my mentor has urged me to constrain my scope of vision in preparation for my thesis. My studio work of late has shifted to focus on the core of my artistic practice. More specifically; the revelation that my art stems, is fueled by, and thrives on my clinically high level of anxiety. It made sense to address an intensely personal aspect of my life that generally remains undisclosed, and therefore, undiscussed.

The scale is perhaps the most initially striking aspect, and is executed horizontally; the way that humans rest. The piece’s central focus is a closely cropped image of the sleeping face of an unidentified subject. The size is intended to provoke initial interest in the viewer, while setting the tone for the magnitude of the image’s metaphorical weight. The sitter is clearly at rest as her eyes are closed and her expression neutral. It is important that the subject was asleep for this piece, as it is arguably the most vulnerable position that a person can find themselves in. The subject is the image of a woman with whom I had a relationship with. While this is an important fact, she is not intended to be the viewer’s sole focus. She acts less individually, and more as a vehicle for addressing issues relevant to my life. The anxiety in this instance stems not from the image of her, but from the conversations that will be ignited when this piece hangs on the wall for all to see.

The anxiety stems from the acknowledgement of my role in the ongoing conversations about same-sex couples. I avoid discussing this piece of my life due to the desire to avoid labels or categories that seek to further define individuals. There is a certain lack of control that exists in the way others perceive your existence as both human and artist. This highly intimate moment is cropped and magnified in a way that retains the sensitivity of the photo from which it originated, while simultaneously magnifies an inescapable aspect of my life. The painting is literally larger than life, and puts personal details about my romantic relationships on display and up for discussion; something I seldom do in my life outside the studio. The anxiety seeps into this discussion as it opens the lines of communication that can invite negative criticism, thoughts, or judgements. The piece elicits feelings of vulnerability, and vulnerability feeds the anxiety. Inescapable is a word I feel is appropriate which is why I chose to create a highly personal moment on this scale. It is a confrontation with this facet of my life in a poignant, yet subtle way while leaving the anonymous subject and her role open to the audience’s interpretation.detail2.1 detail2. detail1. detail2.2

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Varnish!

Here are a few pictures of the portrait of my brother with varnish. The varnish is put on after work is completed and it brings the colors back to the way they looked when they were applied. Oxidation occurs when the paint dries and results in the colors losing depth and saturation. Essentially, the colors and finish on this piece look the way they did while wet. Sorry about the glare on the surface!

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